Aside

dogtreatrecallbootsbarclayey

Expanded Dog Treat Recall for Several Other Brands: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm340337.htm

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – February 19, 2013 – Kasel  Associated Industries of Denver, CO is voluntarily recalling ALL PRODUCTS  MANUFACTURED AT ITS DENVER, COLORADO FACILITY FROM APRIL 20, 2012 THRU SEPTEMBER  19, 2012 due to possible Salmonella contamination. Salmonella  can sicken animals that eat these products and humans are at risk for salmonella  poisoning from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not  thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the pet products or any  surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor  themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea  or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella  can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections,  endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract  symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these symptoms after having contact with this  product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have  diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only  decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy  pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has  consumed the recalled product and has any of these signs, please contact your  veterinarian.

The recalled Products of Dog Treats were distributed nationwide  through various retailers from April 20th to September 19th.

Kasel Industries is recalling Boots & Barkley, BIXBI, Nature’s  Deli, Colorado Naturals, Petco, and Best Bully Stick items. Lot numbers as shown  in 1 Year Best By Date Table and 2 Year Best By Date Table, which are  attached.

Kasel Industries has not received any reports of illnesses to date  in connection with these products.

No other products made by Kasel Associated Industries are included  in the recall. Specifically no products with best by dates after the specified  ranges are included in the recall.

Consumers who have purchased any listed products are urged to  return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions  may contact Kasel Associated Industries at (800) 218-4417 Monday thru Friday  from 7am to 5pm MDT.

2 Year Best By  Date

UPC

 

Lot/Best By Date

085239043165

Boots&Barkley American Beef Bully Stick 12″

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

085239403495

Boots&Barkley American Smoked Beef Femur Bone 3″

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

085239043103

Boots&Barkley American Flossie 6-8″

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

085239403440

Boots&Barkley American Pig Ear Strips 8oz

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

085239043202

Boots&Barkley American Chicken Stuffed Beef Femur Bone 6″

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

085239043110

Boots&Barkley American Braided Bully Stick 5″

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

085239043325

Boots&Barkley American Chicken Jerky 16oz

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

085239043400

Boots&Barkley American Chicken Jerky 8oz

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

490830400086

Boots&Barkley American Variety Pack 32oz

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

647263899196

Boots&Barkley American Beef Ribs 2ct

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

647263899172

Boots&Barkley American  Beef Knuckle

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

647263899158

Boots&Barkley American Pig Ears 12ct

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

647263899189

Boots&Barkley American Beef Bully Sticks 6ct

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

647263899165

Boots&Barkley American Pork Femur

20APR2014 DEN-03OCT2014 DEN

681131857246

Roasted Pig Ear Dog Treats 28oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

800443092903

25 PK Natural Pig Ears

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

800443092910

12 PK Natural Pig Ears

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

800443092927

12 PK Smoked Pig Ears

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

800443092934

7 PK Natural Pig Ears

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

800443092941

7 PK Smoked Pig Ears

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

647263800291

16oz Chicken Chips

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

647263900151

16oz Salmon Jerky

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

647263800178

4oz Chicken Jerky

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

647263510176

4oz Lamb Jerky

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

647263900175

4 oz Salmon Jerky

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

647263801175

4oz Beef Jerky

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

647263800291

16oz Chicken Jerky

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

647263700157

16oz Pork Jerky

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

091037018021

BIXBI Skin & Coat Beef Liver Jerky 5oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

091037018045

BIXBI Skin & Coat Lamb Jerky 5oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

091037018007

BIXBI Skin & Coat Chicken Breast Jerky Treats 5oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

091037018069

BIXBI Skin & Coat Pork Jerky 5oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

091037018144

BIXBI Hip And Joint Pork Jerky 5oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

091037018120

BIXBI Hip And Joint Lamb Jerky 5oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

091037018083

BIXBI Hip And Joint Chicken Breast Jerky 5oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

091037018106

BIXBI Hip And Joint Beef Liver Jerky 5oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Bulk

TDBBS, Inc Buffalo Hearts Sliced 3 lbs

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Bulk

TDBBS, Inc Knee Caps 25 Ct

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Unknown

TDBBS, Inc Pork Jerky Strips 16oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Unknown

TDBBS, Inc Chicken Jerky 16oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Unknown

TDBBS, Inc Turkey Cubes 4.5oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Bulk

TDBBS, Inc Pig Snouts 25ct

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Bulk

TDBBS, Inc Beef Lobster Tails 1ct

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Unknown

TDBBS, Inc Turkey Jerky Sticks 6ct

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Unknown

TDBBS, Inc Hearts of Lamb 4oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

Unknown

TDBBS, Inc Lamb Jerky 4oz

04202014 DEN-10032014 DEN

1 Year Best By Date

UPC

 

Lot/Best By Date

647263800215

Nature’s Deli Chicken Jerky 3lbs

04202013 DEN-10032013 DEN

647263800208

Nature’s Deli Chicken Jerky 2.5lbs

04202013 DEN-10032013 DEN

###

Charlotte NC Police bust reported dog fighting ring

dogringcharlottebustBy WSOC

Published: Saturday, February 9, 2013 at 13:42 PM.

http://www.gastongazette.com/news/local/police-bust-reported-dog-fighting-ring-1.92784

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — On Friday, officers with the Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department’s Hickory Grove Division and Animal Care and Control Unit made arrests in a dog fighting ring in east Charlotte.

Officers said the house on Carelock Circle has several pit bulls in the backyard. When officers arrived, they reported several pit bulls were tied up with large chains that were attached to spikes driven into the ground.

Upon arrival, Animal Control officers said they located evidence consistent with training dogs for the purpose of fighting.

Officers located a total of 27 animals on the property and several of the animals had injuries consistent with dog fighting.

Both paraphernalia for dog fighting and a dog fighting arena were also discovered on the property.

Melvin Smith, 46, and Lefonze Williams, 42, were arrested and are both being charged with felony training animals with the purpose of dog fighting and baiting.

Based on the number of dogs and evidence seized at the scene, this location is one of the largest dog fighting operations the CMPD and Animal Care and Control have investigated to date.

NC Man wanted for animal cruelty, another charged

dogfightingpicbustPosted: Feb 11, 2013 9:20 AM EST Updated: Feb 11, 2013 5:59 PM EST

By: WECT Staff – email
Land where three dogs were found dead.
One of the dogs found chained up. (Source: Fair Bluff Police Department)
Xavier Hemingway (Source: Fair Bluff Police Department)

FAIR BLUFF, NC (WECT) – Officers with the Fair Bluff Police Department have arrested one man in connection to an animal cruelty case, and are searching for another.

According to Chief J.H. Hewett, someone called to report dog fighting in the area of Hamer Street but didn’t give any information about who was involved.

While officers were responding to a stolen property call on the same street, Hewett said several dogs were seen nearby that appeared to be mistreated.

After further inspection, the dogs appeared to have life-threatening injuries and were chained to stakes driven in the ground.

According to Hewett, Columbus County Animal Control took six bull dogs into custody. Officers also found at least three other dogs were found deceased and decomposed across the street.

Monday, Fair Bluff police received several calls from people who recently had dogs stolen. Officers tell us, they’re investigating to see if any of those dogs were some of the ones they seized. While we were at the animal control shelter, we learned people had already adopted some of the dogs.

James Earl Hemingway was arrested and charged with:

• six counts of cruelty to animals
• assault and battery
• two counts of communicating threats
• assault on a handicapped person
• attempted larceny of a motor vehicle
• two counts of possession of stolen goods

Officers are looking for Xavier Hemingway who will be charged with:

• six counts of cruelty to animals
• assault and battery
• communicating threats
• assault on a handicapped person
• attempted larceny of a motor vehicle
• two counts of possession of stolen goods

Anyone with information regarding Xavier Hemingway’s whereabouts is asked to contact the Fair Bluff Police Department at (910) 649-7323.

Aside

SpaynNeuter

Robeson County Humane Society helps with Spay & Neuter  Clinics.To combat the problem, the animal shelter at 3180 W. Fifth St., which is open Tuesdays through Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., is offering a voucher redeemable at any veterinarian’s office in Robeson County for a free spay or neuter. A person making less than $33,510 a year is eligible. Two people making less than a combined income of $45,390 a year are also eligible.

U.S. marines killing a sheep with a baseball bat

Is this where we really want to be in this world? Is this where we have slipped to? For anyone to kill an animal in this fashion is unacceptable but w.o a doubt our Men in Uniform. I can only think of the extreme pain this animal was put in by being hit so hard over and over in the head. God will punich us all one day for this type of behavior. It is totally UNACCEPTABLE !

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGn610jADJY

Foster Care for a Rescue Dog

The following article appeared in the March 1994 issue of Texas Dogs.

Texas Dogs, 2737 Oak Mountain Trail, San Angelo, TX 76904; (915) 944-7016.

Copyright 1994, M. Shirley Chong.

Foster Care for a Rescue Dog

by M. Shirley Chong

You heard about this dog from your hair dresser; you got a referral call from the chair of your national rescue club, someone that you know from dog shows heard about this dog that needed help and found your name through an old show catalog. You met the dog; not a gem and not a monster, but a nice dog with some promise. You’ve got a foster dog.

Like any foster parent, you have a special task ahead of you. You have to guide, teach, help, and love this refugee, without becoming this dog’s special one-and-only person. You have to be ready to spend time and energy and love on this dog, and yet be able to give it up when the right family comes along. If everything works out right, someday not too far in the future, there’ll be a lump in your throat and maybe even tears in your eyes as you watch your foster dog eagerly leave your home and loving care for a new life with a new family.

But before that day comes, you’ve got work to do! Very few dogs land im rescue without a few minor quirks or problems-hey, if they were perfect, they probably wouldn’t have landed in rescue! The less you know about the dog, the more you’ll need to do to increase the chances of a happy placement.

The first thing that needs to be done is to make sure the foster dog is housetrained. Even if you were told by a previous owner that the dog never makes a mistake and is perfectly housetrained, be a skeptic! Dogs that didn’t get much socialization often learn not to soil the house they live in, but they never had a chance to generalize to other houses or buildings. The first week or 80 that you have a foster dog treat it as if it were an eight week old puppy. Constant supervision when the dog is loose in the house and crated or otherwise confined to their bed when it isn’t possible to supervise.

During this first week or so, don’t push any other training issues, if possible. Let the foster dog settle in and get oriented Carefully referee interaction between the foster dog and your own dogs. If the foster dog is not in good health, postpone serious training and testing until the dog is well on the road to recovery. Dogs that are emaciated often show mental effects of starvation–they can be unnaturally passive, uninvolved, uninterested in other dogs or in human beings. It is impossible to accurately assess the temperament of a starving dog. I don’t want to try to provide a guide for dealing with an emaciated dog–consult with your vet. I will say that in general, slow and steady weight gain is better than putting on a lot of weight in a hurry. The mental effects of starvation can take as much as twice as long for the dog to recover from as it took to put the weight back on the dog (in other words, if it took six months to build the dog up to a normal weight, it can take up to a year for the dog to be mentally normal.) An emaciated dog CAN be brought back, but it isn’t a quick fix-it project.

After the first week or so, start working on basic commands. Make sure the foster dog knows how to walk nicely on lead, sit and down on command, and come when called. If you add in stays, most pet owners would consider this a well trained dog! Also work on the problems that are least acceptable to most pet homes: destructive chewing and jumping up on people.

Again, treat the foster dog as a puppy–get it out as much as possible, expose it to new people and new situations Make sure to visit several different (dog lover’s) houses, so that you can be sure that the dog really does understand that housetraining means ALL houses, not just yours! As you work with this foster dog, be alert to things that may be TRIGGERS for fear or aggression. Common triggers are holding a rolled up newspaper or magazine and tapping it on one hand); calling the dog in a loud (angry sounding) voice; shuffling feet toward the dog—dog interprets it as an attempt to kick); holding any long object, such as a yardstick or leash; bending over the dog, especially if the dog is lying down; suddenly raising a hand (for instance, as if you were waving to a friend across the street); suddenly reaching out, especially towards the dog’s head; being near or picking up the dogs food dish; taking away a toy that the dog is chewing on; taking away an object that the dog has stolen (like a sock or a piece of garbage); leaning over the dog as you put it in a down.

Don’t avoid triggers; in fact, you should test for them. If the dog reacts to something, this shows you an area that you need to defuse, for the dog’s peace of mind and the safety of the adoptive family. If you discover a trigger, you need to assess how strong the dog’s reaction is and whether you feel capable of de-fusing it. This may also affect your selection of an adoptive family.

There are some other things that you should learn about vour foster dog:

  • how this dog reacts to children of different ages (from babe in arms to teenagers)
  • how this dog reacts to cats
  • how this dog reacts to birds (ducks or pigeons) outside
  • is there any difference in how this dog reacts to men or women?
  • is this dog more likely to be irritable or cranky after more exercise than usual?
  • how does this dog react to having it’s usual activity level curtailed for a day or two?
  • how does this dog react to being given a pill? (you can test by using a pill sized bit of hot dog or cheese; open the dog’s mouth and push it down as if it were a pill; repeat the test later)

The above information will definitely affect your choice of an adoptive home; what these things have in common is that they are basic instinct/temperament/personality issues. If the dog has very high prey drive (wants to chase any cat or bird it sees), placing it in a home with small animal pets might not be a good match. If the dog truly does not like children of a certain age, it may learn to love a family member of that age, but it may never like other children of that age (so does this child bring home lots of friends?). The pill test tells you how willing the dog is to accept unfamiliar sorts of handling.

To a certain extent, the breed you are dealing with influences how long you should hold onto a foster dog to assess them. An easygoing, gentle, typically submissive breed may be easier to place sooner, without extensive testing and training than a breed with a more difficult temperament. Taking the time to really learn about your foster dog will pay off when you are trying to play Yentl, to make a match for life!

Our Efforts

Nc Shelter Rescue, Inc. works tirelessly on issues that greatly impact our Shelter Friends. Whether it’s organizing a fundraiser to buy new beds, cages, food or a blanket drive, we do what we can to make a positive difference in theselives of an abandoned animal. We also look at what programs are in place in the county shelters and if they can be improved upon and if so we offer to help accomplish these tasks. We here at Nc Shelter Rescue, Inc. are not just an agency that alerts others of issues that impact our shelter friends; we are hands on involved. When we set out on a program you will see us involved until the very end, no matter how long it takes, and we will work hand in hand until the tasks are accomplished.

What can you do to help our shelter friends? You can start by spaying\neutering your family pet(s) and spreading the word that in North Carolina alone over 280,000 shelter friends are killed each year. And sadly North Carolina has around 21 counties that still use Gas Chambers as the form of euthanasia. Help end the huge useless loss life of so many by reaching out for low cost spay and neuter clinics at http://www.snap-nc.org along with standing with us to end gassing in North Carolina by contacting our state legislators at http://www.ncleg.net.

One Voice can make a difference in the life of an animal and that one voice starts with you.