Tag Archives: Gas Chambers

NC Animal Shelter Sanitation Rules

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(click on picture to enlarge for view)

My local animal shelter hose down and clean the kennels with the animals still in the cage, is this acceptable in a NC County Animal Shelter? The answer No.

The animals must be removed from the kennels during the cleaning process for a number of reasons to include the assurance that the animal is not coming into contact with the cleaners and disinfectants, to keep the animal dry esp. if it’s a younger animal to ensure it stays clean and dry to better fend off the parvo or distemper virus, but mainly to be humane to these shelter animals who have found their way into a shelter environment that’s unfamiliar and frightening to them. And last but not least as it’s part of our NC Animal Welfare Act that these shelters must abide by.

What should you do if you see a NC County Shelter employee using cleaning products or a water hose in an kennel while the animal is still housed inside? Document the events. Write down the time, the employee’s name, the kennel number or ID number of the animal, take a picture if possible and report this to the shelter manager immediately but also follow up with an email to the NC Department of Agriculture on these events to ensure this situation doesn’t happen again.

Email address for the NC Dept. Of Agriculture: AGR.AWS@ncagr.gov

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Euthanasia Guidelines: The Gas Chamber Debate

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It took way to long but FINALLY it’s here. The new AVMA’s statement on gas chambers, they are no longer being listed as acceptable ( due to conditions) to kill our companion animals. So NC remove your 13 Gas Chambers that still are in operation in 2013.

http://atwork.avma.org/2013/02/26/euthanasia-guidelines-the-gas-chamber-debate/

Euthanasia Guidelines: The Gas Chamber Debate
February 26, 2013 | Dr. Gail Golab

Now that the 2013 edition of the AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals has been issued, the debate over the use of gas chambers for euthanasia of unwanted dogs and cats in animal shelters is likely to take center stage once again.

In previous editions of the guidelines, the use of carbon monoxide (CO) or carbon dioxide (CO2) gas was considered ‘acceptable’ for euthanasia of dogs and cats. In the 2013 Guidelines, the classification for use of these gases has been changed to ‘acceptable with conditions’. Techniques that are ‘acceptable with conditions’ may have greater potential for operator error or safety hazard, are not well documented in the scientific literature, or may require a secondary method to ensure death. The use of these techniques requires that specific conditions be met to ensure that death is achieved in a humane way. When ALL of the conditions are met, ‘acceptable with conditions’ methods are equivalent to ‘acceptable’ methods. And, if all conditions are not met, they are not considered ‘acceptable.’

This means that the use of CO or CO2 for euthanasia of dogs and cats is ONLY considered acceptable when ALL of the following criteria are met. For more details, consult the full Guidelines.

1.Personnel must be instructed thoroughly in the gas’s use and must understand its hazards and limitations;

2.The gas source and chamber must be located in a well-ventilated environment, preferably out-of-doors;

3.The gas must be supplied in a precisely regulated and purified form without contaminants or adulterants, typically from a commercially supplied cylinder or tank;

4.The gas flow rate must allow operators to achieve known and appropriate gas concentrations within the recommended time;

5.The chamber must be of the highest-quality construction and should allow for separation of individual animals. If animals need to be combined, they should be of the same species, and, if needed, restrained or separated so that they will not hurt themselves or others. Chambers should not be overloaded and need to be kept clean to minimize odors that might distress animals that are subsequently euthanized;

6.The chamber must be well lighted and must allow personnel to directly observe the animals;

7.If the chamber is inside a room, monitors must be placed in the room to warn personnel of hazardous concentrations of gas; and

8.It is essential that the gas and the chamber be used in compliance with state and federal occupational health and safety regulations.

In the 2013 Guidelines, euthanasia by intravenous injection of an approved euthanasia agent remains the preferred method for euthanasia of dogs, cats, and other small companion animals. Gas chambers are not recommended for routine euthanasia of cats and dogs in shelters and animal control operations. The guidelines state that “alternate methods with fewer conditions and disadvantages are recommended for companion animals where feasible.”

We understand that some people believe these chambers should be banned for use for dogs and cats. Unfortunately, there are still shelters and animal control operations that do not have access to controlled substances and/or the personnel authorized by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to administer them. This limits these facilities’ options for euthanizing animals. If your local shelter or animal control operation uses a gas chamber to euthanize dogs and cats and you strongly believe its use should be discontinued, we recommend you work with the facility to develop a realistic plan to phase out the use of the chamber. Reducing the population of unwanted animals reduces the number of animals that may need to be euthanized, so efforts to reduce pet relinquishments and increase adoptions are the best long-term solutions.